Multiculturalism in the workplace

Aotearoa New Zealand is a bicultural nation, with a growing multicultural population. It is essential that business owners and managers actively use the principles of cultural diversity as a basis for decision making and growing company culture in a way that affirms employees’ cultural identities.

That is not to say that a person who identifies as an ethnic minority should be seen as “needy, vulnerable and victimised” (Singham, 2006, p. 36). Singham states strongly “I do not want people to be nice to me, help me settle better and retain my mother tongue… Rather, I want to be valued and included because my contributions … are recognised and respected” (2006, p. 36).

Take for example, UTech, a (not real) company in Wellington that has recently employed several Filipinos, who are new to Aotearoa NZ. The manager, Maureen, uses Hofstede’s Dimensions in Cross Cultural Management to help her consider how to ensure all employees feel recognised and respected. It is immediately apparent that, according to the Hofstede dimensions of Power Distance and Individualism, Filipinos appear high in Power Distance (Aotearoa NZ appears low). Therefore, the new Filipino employees could find the accessibility to managers, and expectations around the sharing of expertise, quite challenging. In turn, the Kiwi employees may be frustrated by the Filipinos’ more formal, less direct or passive approach, to communication. When it comes to individualism, in the Aotearoa NZ context, the Filipinos may struggle with a business community that appears to be less close-knit, and that expects a high level of self-reliance. On the other hand, the Kiwis could find it challenging when their new Filipino colleagues appear to require more direction.

Maureen uses this information to work with all her employees to help raise their awareness, and hone their communication skills. Quite quickly, a wide range of previously unnoticed talents becomes obvious, with the additional benefit that the diversity of viewpoints is recognised, and there is a lot more creative problem-solving. While there are a few speed-bumps along the way, the team is focussed on developing their communication skills and works through the challenges to build synergy. Employees report feeling happier, more engaged, and the number of new projects underway increases.

This example illustrates that business owners and managers in Aotearoa NZ, who acknowledge cultural diversity, will be able to provide support for employees so that they become aware of the differences between specific characteristics. Such support will help ensure that employees value the strengths, motives, viewpoints, and life experiences that cultural diversity brings.

References

Hofstede,G. (1980) Culture’s Consequences: International Differences in Work-Related Values. Beverly Hills CA: Sage Publications.

Singham, M. (2006). Multiculturalism in New Zealand – the need for a  new paradigm. Aotearoa Ethnic Network Journal 1(1). 33-37.

Image

Circle of feet. CC ( BY NC ND ) licensed Flickr image by Adam Connolly: https://flic.kr/p/3QR3y

Posted in Professional Learning Development | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Why gender diversity enhances the workplace….

Image of pots labelled identify findersThere is no doubt that diversity in the workplace can be beneficial. However, it is important to avoid generalisations, especially when referring to gender (Medland, 2012). Lynda Gratton (director of the Centre for Women in Business at London Business School), for example, observes that “there is no substantive difference between men and women at work. Some people are highly caring and intuitive and others are not” (in Medland, 2012, Para 8).

It is also essential to recognise that gender diversity includes people who may or may not identify as male, female, transgender, androgynous, or bigender, and that in the workplace behaviour can be “influenced by issues as far-ranging as self-esteem, opportunities, and society’s expectations” (Medland, 2012, Para 24).

Some of the current research indicates that a workplace with gender diversity can:

  • Bring varied perspectives, ideas and experiences to teams, and add to collective knowledge.
  • Help people feel happier, more resilient in the face of challenges / change, and be more cooperative.
  • Provide a range of approaches to problem solving, team building, and analysis of issues, and lead to improved decision-making.
  • Foster a range of communication styles.
  • Enhance productivity and economic growth (World Economic Forum, 2012).
  • Broaden notions of ‘success’, and what the associated attributes ‘look like’.
  • Provide a variety of support when a company is working with challenges or turbulent governance.

Within workplaces where gender diversity is actively sought, roles within the organisation, including leadership roles, are often reimagined to be more collaborative and supportive. In turn, this reframing of roles can make the company more appealing and accessible to a much more diverse pool of talent” (Berhane, 2015, n.p.).

References

Berhane, S. (2015). How To Make Gender Equality At Work Matter To Everyone. Retrieved from http://www.fastcompany.com/3052401/strong-female-lead/how-to-make-gender-equality-at-work-everyones-problem.

World Economic Forum. (2012). The global gender gap report 2012. Retrieved from http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GenderGap_Report_2012.pdf.

Image

Identity finders. CC ( BY ND ND ) licensed Flickr image by James Box: https://flic.kr/p/4ZJvm1

Posted in All, Professional Learning Development | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Who are the four generations in today’s workforce?

Before describing the four generations that may be present in today’s workplace, it is important to identify a couple of caveats around generational cohort research. Parry and Urwin (2011) indicate that there is a tendency toward ‘snapshot’ research rather than longitudinal studies of individuals or cohorts. Also, the research design often does not account for differences such as gender and ethnicity. Therefore the broad-brush statements about the impact of common experiences that shape generational cohorts tend to be flawed because it is unlikely that people of the same generation will experience things similarly when their contexts, social and cultural backgrounds differ.

 With these caveats in mind, the generalisations can be useful for coaching as they may indicate possible motivations, values, and ideas, as well as the types of support that might be most effective.

The Silent Generation / Traditionalists (born before 1946)

As employees this generation tend to be loyal to their employers and will stick at a job no matter what. In return, they expect their employers to be loyal to them, which includes providing a tenured career path with associated promotions and raises. They are often accepting of organisational hierarchy, like a degree of autonomy and flexibility, and frequently have well-developed interpersonal skills. Work ethic is measured by timeliness, productivity, and by not standing out.

Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964)

This generation have experienced downsizings and associated career challenges, tend to compete for positions, and be individualistic. At work, relationship building and teamwork are seen as crucial, and they expect loyalty from those with whom they work. During their career they may have had a range of jobs, where they place less importance on productivity and more on the hours worked. As such, they often work long hours, and place their career before personal relationships.

Gen Xers (born between 1965 and 1980)

With a distrust of large organisations, and having seen the layoffs of the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s this generation see every role as temporary. They seek casual, friendly work environments, where they can get involved, and that are places to learn, which provide them with flexibility and freedom. Regardless of another employee’s position, title, or tenure, this generation want open communication (although this is often via email), and are not afraid to disagree with managers. They tend to invest loyalty in a person rather than a company. With a preference for short work days achieved by working smarter rather than harder, they value control of their time.

Millennials / Gen Y / Generation Next (born after 1981)

Keen for job security, this generation looks for (and often competes for) jobs that provide personal satisfaction. They look for individuals who will help them with their goals, and are thirsty for leadership, as well as open, frequent communication and feedback from their manager(s). They may try to avoid conflict in the workplace, and want to be close to their peers. With their eyes peeled for opportunities to learn, they are at home in a fast-paced technological environment that often demands their attention across tasks.

Reference:

Parry, E., & Urwin, P. (2011). Generational differences in work values: A review of theory and evidence. International Journal of Management Reviews. 13(1). 79-96.

Image

Identity hand clone. CC ( BY ND SA ) licensed Flickr image by Tillie Ariantho: https://flic.kr/p/4Qk9c8

Posted in All, Professional Learning Development | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The specific benefits of diversity and how coaching can help

Workplaces where there is a clear recognition of the specific benefits of diversity – that are inclusive and respectful of people’s differences (race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, age, geographic background, education, economic background and thinking and communication styles, SIT, n.d.) – have been shown to have higher levels of employee satisfaction and retain employees, as well as being innovative and more able to meet their clients’ needs. However, teams in these organisations need to be effectively managed to ensure good communication and high levels of trust (HCS, n.d.), and help address any tensions that arise.

Coaching can be a valuable tool to help make the most of diversity, in particular because it takes into account a person’s “life experiences, intercultural relationships, … and work experience” (Australian Multicultural Foundation, 2010, p. 105) – all of which are important for effective diversity management.

Coaching can help managers and their teams develop the knowledge, skills, strategies, attitudes, and practices for communicating successfully in diverse work environments, in particular because it can facilitate every employee to:

  • Develop cultural self-awareness in part through becoming aware of their own biases (Australian Multicultural Foundation, 2010).
  • Build key concepts and frameworks for managing and working with diversity.
  • Use approaches such as active listening, paraphrasing to check understanding, transparency of purpose, interpreting the interlocutor’s responses, and being aware of different interpretations of terms – to help with sensitive but clear communication and collaboration.
  • Become aware of their own conscious and unconscious biases and assumptions.
  • Value differences and recognise colleagues’ strengths.
  • Grow their ability to collaborate across cultures (Australian Multicultural Foundation, 2010).

As such, coaching can help teams build positive working relationships, in part by helping people avoid miscommunication based on assumptions and differences.

Associated benefits for the companies who do business in a wide range of countries can include the recruitment of talented people from around the globe, growth of efficacious global executives, an organisational culture that can cope with international mergers and acquisitions, and staff who are possible candidates for expatriate postings.

References

Image: A row of rainbow. CC ( BY NC ND ) licensed Flickr image by Catface27; https://flic.kr/p/pTZgC6

Posted in All, Professional Learning Development | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Finding balance in your life: The coaching wheel

The coaching wheel is a tool used in coaching, for a wide range of reasons (you can find out more about some of the uses in this post – ‘Which solution is best for you?‘). The wheel of life, for example, can help you look at how you are balancing aspects of your life, based on things that are important to you. Completing the wheel can offer a visual way to see where things may be out of balance, especially those where you are expending a lot of energy and time at the detriment to others.

This infographic from MindTools guides you through the steps of completing the wheel of life, along with some ideas on next steps. See what you reckon, and it would be good to hear how you use it.

Posted in All, Professional Learning Development | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Magical questions in coaching

Powerful questions are a cornerstone of coaching. These questions are sometimes called ‘magical’ because they can support a coachee to step around perceived barriers or familiar ways of thinking into a space where they are more creative. Their concrete context (i.e. resources, issues, etc) hasn’t changed, but the way the they are thinking can become more positive, increasing motivating and boosting self-confidence.

The two types of ‘magical questions’ that I frequently use are:

  • Imagine the results, and
  • Time shift

Imagine the results

The ‘imagine the results’ questions invite a coachee to hurdle over the messiness they can see in their here and now, and to step into their world in the future where they have done the hard work and are experiencing the desired outcomes – and can see the purpose behind what they want to do or achieve.

Take, for instance, a coachee who is trying to split their department into self-directed teams, in a way that will increase efficiency and autonomy, but without losing the great sense of collaboration that the department already has. The coachee is, however, facing a range of issues and their mental wheels are spinning in the mud that these issues are creating. One way to support this coachee might be with the following statement and questions:

Imagine that your department is working in teams. Why are they working in teams? What does it look like? What does it feel like? What is different? How was it possible to achieve this?

When I use the ‘imagine the result question’ with coachees I find that sometimes they take a while to get their head into that space, but when they do they are able to focus on what their situation would look and feel like. It helps them focus on the future, rather than barriers or issues that are in the way. Also, in some ways, by stating what they see and by understanding their purpose, it helps it feel more real, and, as a result, helps them develop a plan to move forward (they know where they want to go, so putting together the ‘map’ becomes easier).

 

Time shift

Sometimes we can get overwhelmed by focussing on all the things that we still need to do and the amount of effort that it is going to take to reach our desired outcomes. Sometimes it can be tough to move our focus back to the positive results we are aiming for, and thereby to muster up the energy and motivation we need to get things done.

The ‘time shift’ questions, similar to the ‘imagine the results questions’, can help a coachee look into the future – but with ‘time shift’ it asks the coachee to focus on a general point of time in the future rather than on specific desired outcomes.

Using the same scenario – the coachee who is trying to split their department into self-directed teams – I might use a statement and questions such as:

It is now August 2018. You have achieved your goals. What can you see? What happened? What did you do? What were the main steps in your plan that got you there? How did you start?

The ‘time shift’ questions helps my coachee look into the future and imagine, quite vividly what it would be like for them. They are also able to describe what they did to get there, and by the end of the session are likely to be way more motivated to jump back into their ‘to do’ list and action plan. Often, the coachee will want to revisit the structure of their existing action plan, because they have identified key priorities and steps that need to be included, or that need to be adjusted.

Leading with curiosity

The two open-ended question approaches that I have discussed can be powerful. However, you still need to make sure that you approach every session with true ‘curiosity’, and are fully present (Hess, 2010). When you ask questions because you are curious, rather than because you feel that the question is useful, it keeps everything open. Your curiosity will help you select just the right question for that coachee at that point in time, which helps avoid the possible trap of falling back on questions that you have found have worked previously. It means that you may (often) be surprised by the direction the coachee takes you with their response – and this is where such questions, I would suggest, can be magical. By leading with curiosity and selecting open-ended questions from this basis, the process can be transformational for the coachee in part because they too are surprised by the direction their response take. I have had coachee’s laugh with delight and wonder, asking ‘where did that come from? I didn’t even know I was thinking that!’.
The transformational, magic moments don’t happen every time and you can’t force them (Hess, 2010) – but by using a combination of curiosity and powerful questions, and ensuring you are fully present during a session, the likelihood of such transformational moments occurring, increases.

Reference

Hess, R. (2010.). The Essence of a Great Coaching Question. Retrieved from http://www.prosperouscoachblog.com/essence-great-coaching-question/

Image

Question finger 6. CC ( BY ) licensed Flickr image by Josh Tasman: https://flic.kr/p/RSSjyK

Posted in All, Professional Learning Development | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

What are the ingredients that make assessment meaningful: A guide

Assessment is an inextricable part of learning, and it can be something we do ‘in the moment’ (“hmmm, that was OK but I need to do X next time”), or it could be a high-stakes formal assessment designed and administered by an official organisation.

However, there is a real art to all types of assessment. For instance, with the in the moment example, the key here would then to decide what the next steps would be, when they would happen, and whether we need the input of anyone else. With more formal assessments the art is ensuring that the assessment is meaningful by ensuring the needs of the learners align with, and are given at least equal (maybe greater) importance than the needs of the assessing organisation and wider stakeholders.

First, a quick question – why do we assess?  We assess to provide information (i.e. quantitative evidence) that helps us make informed decisions about ourselves, individuals or programmes, to find out, for example how we are progressing, and what we need to develop more.

So, what is assessment? John Dewey suggests that “Education is a social process; education is growth; education is not preparation for life but is life itself”. I would like to invite you to swap out the word education in the quote, and replace it with ‘assessment’. It then starts to provide an insight into meaningful assessment that provides a bit more depth than ‘making informed decisions’.  For example, what does the act of assessment mean for students? A challenge, a game, fear, whakama (embarrassment), grief, anxiety, a lifechanger, a promotion, a sense of pride…or loss. The list goes on – and something that can be forgotten in the act of designing – and doing – assessments is the ‘human aspect’. It’s not just about the grade.

With these points in mind, I have set about drafting an eight-category checklist to help with the design of meaningful assessments, that will also help you avoid some of the possible pitfalls along the way. It is a draft and I would love any input or suggestions on how you feel it might be improved – what have I missed out? What isn’t reading well? Please jump into the comments below and let me know.

You might also want to have a quick look at the presentation that complements the checklist.

Image: Assessment. CC (BY SA) licensed image by JPhotoStyle.com: http://jphotostyle.com/handwriting/a/assessment.html

Posted in All, Assessment, Blended learning, Design | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Three tips for good design in Moodle courses

Moodle has been used for over 10 years, and yet ‘What comprises a good Moodle course’? is still a hot topic.

Some top tips from Yong Liu include:

1) Mobile learning is key, and gamification is built in as much as possible (although it can be heavy on the budget), plus integration of social media. It is important to automate as many of the processes as possible, while also personalising the learning. However, using an animation or the latest technology, may remove the focus from the learner.

2) It is important to offer opportunities for students to link exiting knowledge with new knowledge. Multimedia can help people learn by helping them select organise and integrate information and understanding (Mayer, 2016). We can only take in visual and aural input, but not two aural inputs at the same time. We can also only take in a limited amount of information at one time. To help alleviate the stress we need to remove redundant and gratuitous graphics, place text near graphics, and explain graphics with audio instead of text if possible.

3) A good Moodle course should simplify complex content, by, for example, segmenting content into small chunks. Information should be precise and exactly what they need, without additional information. Activities also have collaboration, peer teaching – activities where the students do the work themselves. We foster generative processes (Mayer, 2016) by letting the student ‘pull’ knowledge and selecting what they want when they need it. Use conversational tone and pedagogical agents.

What tips could you add to this list? What have you found works a treat for your learners in Moodle?

Image: Design. CC ( BY SA ) licensed Flickr image by Miquel Lopez: https://flic.kr/p/5oQgCo

Posted in All, Blended learning, e-learning | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

How do you coach an intuitor-type person?

Image of a tree on a handSome people find it really useful to be more aware about the ways they think or react, and there are a range of approaches and tools available that can help us do this. Carl Jung, in the 1920s, for instance, suggested that we process and react to inputs by thinking, feeling, intuiting, or sensing:

  • Thinkers tend to collect and consciously analyse data.
  • Feelers are open to emotions and their consequences.
  • Intuitors don’t find detail useful, and act on on their decisions, although they may not be aware of how they reached the decision.
  • Sensors tend to be kinaesthetic and rely on their senses to guide their reactions and actions.

Marchant (2014) identifies that everyone uses all four. However, many of us “favour one way over the other three, sometimes markedly so” (Para. 15), and it’s being cognisant of whether we favour one over another that can be helpful.

Given these factors, I will now focus on the intuitor-type of person In a coaching context; in particular I’ll identify aspects that might help me coach this person, and what I might need to keep an eye open for.

If I am working with a person who strongly identifies as an intuitor type I would expect that they are likely to:

  • be focussed on potential and future possibilities (although these can seem unrealistic)
  • look for patterns and relationships
  • be (apparently) impulsive because they seem to react rather than taking time to consider ‘the facts’
  • have a wide range of ideas
  • not be keen on detail or data
  • enjoy using their imagination
  • enjoy being creative and inventive
  • like to work with conceptual ideas and information
  • be idealistic
  • be focussed on bigger picture rather than processes and guidelines

I would try to shape coaching sessions to help ensure that there are plenty of opportunities for my coachee to talk through their ideas (including philosophic underpinnings and principles). During these descriptions I would gently encourage them to unpack a bit more detail, but in a way that signals I am curious about, and value, their insights. Supportive questions might be around encouraging the coachee to consider how other people in their context  respond positively to their ideas, and, if appropriate, I would also ask questions about other (online) communities and places the coachee could share, discuss, and develop ideas further.

One of the things I would need to keep an eye on is that the coachee doesn’t end up going through similar cycles and not recognising them as such – especially if they are making the same mistake each time. For example, a coachee might describe a series of situations where they receive the feedback ‘we don’t know what you are working on most of the time – or why’. It could even have led to misunderstandings to the point where they have been pulled in for a meeting and questioned about what they are spending their time doing. Usually, it’s a case that the coachee has been so completely focussed on a task or project that they haven’t taken the time to communicate their progress to anyone else, and have seen the feedback as a minor annoyance – until, to their surprise, serious questions start to be asked about their performance.

In situations like this one, I would encourage my coachee through a deductive process:

  1. to consider the implications of their complete focus (i.e. the bigger picture),
  2. and how the positive progress they are making (i.e. the details),
  3. could be (creatively) communicated with any stakeholders who needed to know so that these stakeholders can / will continue to support and fund the piece of work on which the coachee is focussing,
  4. and finally, encourage the coachee to identify ways they can share with co-workers, managers, family and friends their “preferred intuitive information gathering preference” (Edward, n.d., Para. 5).

The central thing here is to support my coachee to clearly identify the ‘why’, so that they have a clear reason and motivation to carry through with a necessary action (possibly in a creative way). In this example, it would be a strategy that could also ensure that they keep their role! In turn, by opening up awareness and lines of communication, ideally it would lead to increased support and recognition of the value of the work the coachee is doing.

References

Marchant, J. (2014). Thinker, feeler, knower, sensor? Retrieved from http://www.emotionalintelligenceatwork.com/resources/thinker-feeler-knower-sensor/.

Southern Institute of Technology (a). (n.d.) Transformational Coaching and its outcomes (Module C) [Lecture notes]. Retrieved from CBC106 (NET).

Posted in All, Professional Learning Development | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Making the change we know in our hearts is essential…by building a coaching culture

This was a guest post for CORE education, which originally appeared as:  Making the change we know in our hearts is essential…by building a coaching culture.

Today’s leaders are expected to work well with people. This expectation includes being able to help people to grasp the courage to act, develop new ideas, take risks, and “make the changes that we know in our hearts are essential and right in the world” (Robertson, 2015, p. 15). A strong mentoring or coaching relationship is one way of supporting people to do this. As a result, globally, a wide range of organisations — including schools, kura, and early childhood centres — are developing a coaching culture (Weekes, 2008).
These organisations hope to realise a wide range of benefits for educators, students, and the wider community including personal (and professional) growth (Hay, 1995); resilience in the face of change; support of innovation and ‘passion projects’; and the fostering of leadership and personal effectiveness. Coaching, when framed as an approach to communication where the empowerment of the people being coached is emphasised (Hoole, & Riddle, 2015), helps create positive learning environments. It also helps incubate a range of leadership approaches — something that research findings indicate have significant impacts on performance and wellbeing, as well as associated health benefits (Hoole, & Riddle, 2015).

What is a coaching culture?

At its root, a coaching culture is a model that structures and helps define the parameters of what effective interpersonal interactions look and feel like within a school, kura, or centre. Coaching would not be the only approach used in the organisation, but it would be used wherever appropriate. These structures and parameters are firmly underpinned by the values of the organisation, and can support the development of agreed ways of communicating, collaborating, and working together (Behavioral Coaching Institute, 2007).
However, sometimes, coaching may have a negative reputation within an organisation because, for instance, managers have previously used it as a performance management tool rather than as a genuine way to support professional learning and development. In these cases, a concerted effort will be needed to reframe coaching to help ensure that it is perceived positively, and part of this will be to support managers to develop their own coaching skills.
A well-established coaching culture will be one where coaching methodologies are ‘normalised’ within the organisation. For instance, it will be the preferred way of having conversations (Hoole, & Riddle, 2015). When this occurs, all people within the culture “fearlessly engage in candid, respectful coaching conversations, unrestricted by reporting relationships, about how they can improve their working relationships” (Crane, 2005, para. 3). These conversations will make use of coaching tools and the language of coaching to become part of the everyday way of working together. As a result, everyone values coaching as an integral part of personal and professional development — as a way of continually learning, improving practice, and positively contributing to the organisation’s goals.

The importance of providing a coaching programme to develop a coaching culture

An integral part of nurturing a coaching culture within a school, kura, or centre is ensuring that staff and students / ākonga are provided with formal opportunities to develop their own coaching skills. Otherwise, the tendency is for people to default to the neurologically energy-efficient approach of telling, which “requires less intellectual and emotional energy than engaging …[someone] in a thought process to advance their capability” (Hoole, & Riddle, 2015, Para 29).
A coaching programme will help staff and students / ākonga develop conceptual connections and explore implications for their organisation and the wider community. The long-term nature of the resulting changes can make a large-scale impact on everyone’s wellbeing, as well as how well the organisation functions.
Coaching managers will need to be coached themselves prior to taking on a coaching role. They will also need the ongoing support of their coach to help them continue to develop strong coaching skills, and to use integrity and patience to build the trust with their coachees. A coaching manager’s “ability to deeply listen is just as important as asking the questions that count” (Robertson, 2015, p. 12), especially where the goal is to ensure the coachee feels “sufficiently safe to move away from covering up any perceived areas of weakness” (Robertson, 2015, p. 12).
It takes time to develop a coaching culture (up to a year or 18 months) because people need to be comfortable within the culture, and this provides sufficient time for everyone to develop the necessary coaching skills (The Open Door Coaching Group, 2012).

One consideration

By definition, a manager is not ideally placed to work as a coach or mentor for someone who is reporting directly to them. Robertson (2015) advises that vulnerability, power relations or conflicts of purpose “can adversely affect the relationship” (Robertson, 2015, p. 12).

What does the development of a coaching culture look like in practice?

Midtown School has a focus on across-school change, plus a desire to sustain the changes by implementing a coaching culture. After some robust discussions, the decision was made to go for a combination of face-to-face, whole school Professional Learning and Development, combined with virtual mentoring and coaching support for the leadership team who would then help to nurture a coaching culture throughout the school. Using the suite of products and services that CORE Education has available, the school decided to go for four face-to-face sessions (once a term), which were also supported by 18 months of uChoose virtual mentoring sessions for the leadership team.
Over the first six months with their virtual mentor the leadership team planned how they were going to introduce, support, and build sustainability into the coaching culture focus. They surveyed the staff, students and community, and gathered feedback data. The data provided some great insights into where people were most enthusiastic, plus, where the main support was going to be required. Alongside the planning, the leadership team with their mentor, worked with a range of coaching tools and approaches, trialled them with their teams, and then reflected together on how it went, and what they might change.
During the second half of the year working in the uChoose programme, after a whole-school session that focused on coaching, the leadership team rolled out some ‘quick dip, how to’ coaching sessions. Although it was a slow start, groups within the school started to increase their deliberate acts of coaching and coaching conversations, with some positive results.
In the new year, after 16 months of working to develop a coaching culture, it was clear that things were starting to consolidate, and it was noticed that:
  • There was a school-wide identity with, and commitment to, the development of a coaching culture, with all staff and ākonga / students knowing most of the goals, as well as the contributions they could make in achieving them.
  • There was increased enthusiasm and commitment to the overall school change initiative, with leaders and champions emerging from both the staff and the students / ākonga. They were jumping in to develop ‘passion projects’, initiatives with ‘an impact’, projects that were helping to enhance multicultural perspectives and practices, and as well as sustainable initiatives within the community.
  • Several staff reported an increase in confidence in their interactions with each other, the students / ākonga, and the community.
  • There appeared to be fewer humdinger’ arguments — although important, sometimes challenging conversations occurred more frequently.
  • Positive feedback was offered more frequently, and was as objective as possible by removing the ‘personal’, while also ensuring that it was relevant.
  • Staff and students who were new to the school were supported by a recently established initiative that helped them identify their strengths, find their place and to grow within the school

Conclusion

A coaching culture will not solve all an organisation’s challenges, nor will it guarantee that change will be successfully implemented and sustained. However, a school, kura, or centre with a strong coaching culture is likely to encourage a positive working environment, cross-community innovation, increased productivity — and lead to increased personal and professional growth and wellbeing. This in turn can help ensure that the organisation remains responsive and nimble in today’s world of fast-paced communication, diversity, global competition and change. Are you up for it?

Want to know more about uChoose?

Whanake haere ō mahi mā roto mai i ngā whatunga ngaio whai take
Evolving practice through responsive professional partnerships
uChoose is mentored online professional learning, tailored to you and your learning journey.
Our experienced mentors work with you to identify and meet your professional needs, through supporting and challenging your thinking. Your mentor will also identify resources or activities that you will find useful to achieve your goals, or assist you in unpacking items of your own selection that you would like to work through.

References

Behavioral Coaching Institute. (2007). Establishing a coaching culture. Retrieved fromhttp://www.1to1coachingschool.com/Coaching_Culture_in_the_workplace.htm
Crane, T. (2005). Creating a COACHING CULTURE – today’s most potent organizational change process for creating a “high-performance” culture. Business coaching worldwide ezine, 1(1). Retrieved fromhttps://www.wabccoaches.com/bcw/2005_v1_i1/feature.html 
Hay, J. (1995). Transformational Mentoring: Creating Developmental Alliances. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Publishing Co.
Hoole, E., & Riddle, D. (2015). The Intricacies of Creating a ‘Coaching Culture’. Retrieved from http://www.talentmgt.com/articles/7627-the-intricacies-of-creating-a-coaching-culture
Robertson, J. (2015). Deep learning conversations and how coaching relationships can enable them. Australian Education Leader 37(3). 10-15.
The Open Door Coaching Group. (2012). How do I build a coaching culture. Retrieved from http://www.opendoorcoaching.com.au/how-do-i-build-a-coaching-culture
Weekes, S. (2008, July). Catch on to coaching. The Edge. 28 – 32. Retrieved from http://qedcoaching.fastnet.co.uk/pdf/catch-on-to-coaching-ilm-edge-article.pdf

Images

Posted in All, Professional Learning Development | Tagged , , | Leave a comment